Monthly Archives: February 2011

RT @retseptid: Bok Choy Saute

RT @retseptid: Bok Choy Saute: Got my local box from Greenling and decided to try my hand at bok choy – by CP Camper http://bit.ly/hKGOfr

What a treat!

What a treat – Candy just put up Local Strawberries for order separately (was just in Local Box) on Greenling.com! http://ow.ly/442Ea

Grapefruit Chicken Piccata

I know grapefruit piccata sounds a little odd, but I kind of came about this recipe by accident. It turned out to be really yummy though, so here we are. See, I didn’t read my Greenling box insert this week, and saw what I thought were two of the biggest Meyer lemons ever. They had light yellow flesh and were about the size of small oranges. I needed something to make for lunch and had been eyeing this recipe from the latest Cooking Light, so I began to get everything ready to cook.

It wasn’t until I cut into one of the “lemons” that I realized it was, in fact, a grapefruit. Oops. Well, I was hungry, so I sallied forth, grapefruit and all. I like grapefruit and figured it couldn’t be that bad. And it was more than “not that bad” – it was really, really good. This recipe is pretty basic, and the combo of buttery chicken and tart citrus is heavenly.

One thing – the instructions call for pounding the chicken breasts into thin cutlets. You can skip this part if you wish, but here’s why I think you shouldn’t:

1. Pounding meat is a great way to vent frustration.
2. Your chicken will cook evenly if it’s the same thickness all over.
3. It also cooks much faster this way.

And you don’t have to mess with trying to keep the chicken between two pieces of plastic wrap. One day it occurred to me that it was much less messy to just stick the chicken inside of a gallon zip-lock bag while I pounded it. Easy peasy.

Grapefruit Chicken Piccata (adapted from Cooking Light)

4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
1/3 cup sauvignon blanc or other crisp, tart white wine (I buy those mini picnic bottles of wine to use for cooking)
1/2 cup fat-free, lower-sodium chicken broth
1/3 cup fresh grapefruit juice (about 1 grapefruit)
2 tablespoons capers, rinsed and drained

1. Place each chicken breast inside of a gallon zip-lock bag; pound each cutlet to 1/4-inch thickness using a meat mallet or small heavy skillet. Sprinkle cutlets evenly with salt and pepper. Place flour in a shallow dish; dredge cutlets in flour.

2. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add 2 cutlets to pan, and sauté 2 minutes. Turn cutlets over; sauté for 1 minute. Remove the cutlets from pan. Repeat the procedure with remaining 1 tablespoon butter and 2 cutlets.

Add wine to pan, and bring to a boil, scraping pan to loosen browned bits. Cook for 1 minute or until liquid almost evaporates. Stir in chicken broth; bring to a boil. Cook until broth mixture is reduced to 2 tablespoons (about 4 minutes). Stir in juice and capers. Serve over chicken.

Yummy! The Fresh Pasta flavor this week

Yummy! The Fresh Pasta flavor this week is – Basil Red Chili Shells

Turnip & Collard Green Frittata

Picture of frittata

Frittatas are one of the most powerful tools in the home cook’s arsenal. They are extremely forgiving and easy to adapt to whatever ingredients are in the fridge. Plus, you can serve a frittata at pretty much any meal. Pair it with muffins and fruit salad, and there’s brunch. With crunchy green salad and wine, dinner is served.

Lately I’ve been turning to frittatas at the end of the week to use up the veggies straggling in the crisper drawer, both for quick dinners and make-ahead breakfasts. No matter what specific ingredients I have on hand, I always make frittatas using the same basic formula:

  • 2 cups chopped, cooked vegetables, onions, potatoes or meat
  • 6 eggs
  • 1/4 cup liquid dairy- milk, cream, or half and half
  • 1/4 cup shredded cheese
  • salt, pepper, garlic and other spices to taste

The recipe fills a 9-inch deep dish pie pan and bakes up in a 325 degree oven for 50 minutes

For this particular frittata, I took inspiration from the traditional southern preparation of turnips and collard greens and I paired those cruciferous veggies with garlic and heavy cream. Some Romano cheese added a bit of bite to the recipe, and I opted to use a mix of duck and chicken eggs since that’s what I had available. Next time we get turnips and collards in the local box, I’m planning to make this dish again and add some smoky bacon to the mix– I’ll just fry it up at the start of preparation and use the bacon fat to saute the veggies.

Picture of Frittata Ingredients

Turnip and Collard Green Frittata
yield: 6 servings

Ingredients:
olive oil
1 yellow onion
2 turnips
2 garlic cloves
1 bunch collard greens
6 eggs
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup shredded Romano cheese
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions:
Peel and dice onion, turnips and garlic cloves. Chop stems off of collard greens, wash the leaves thoroughly, and chop them into 1/4 inch ribbons. Preheat oven to 325 degrees and use olive oil to grease a 9-inch deep-dish pie pan.

In a heavy bottomed skillet, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat. Saute chopped onions, garlic and turnips until they begin to soften. Add the chopped collard greens to the skillet, and cook them with the other vegetables until they are wilted and soft. Remove skillet from heat and set aside.

Beat the eggs and cream together in a large mixing bowl. Fold in the cooked vegetables, cheese, salt and pepper to the egg mixture and pour frittata batter into prepared pan. Bake for 50 minutes in preheated oven, until eggs are firm.

Click here for a printable copy of this recipe.

Greenling Field Report 2-25-11

Greenling Field Report 2-25-11 http://ow.ly/43qVK You’re kidding, right? Tomatoes in February?!

Local Box Meal Plan: Feb. 21-25

I am so, so excited about getting strawberries this week. What a rare local treat! Here’s the full list, video, and menu plan.

Strawberries – Gunderman Farm
Avocado – G&S Grove
Spinach – Orange Blossom
Planting Onions* – Orange Blossom
Collard Greens – Gunderman Farm
Fennel – J&B Farm
Mushrooms – Kitchen Pride
Bok Choy – Gunderman Farm
Grapefruits – G&S Grove
Meyer Lemons – G&S Grove
Multicolored Carrots – Animal Farm

Strawberry and spinach salad – I like to savor the first strawberries of the season in all their fresh, raw glory, and they have a natural affinity for spinach. Mix sliced strawberries with roughly chopped spinach, thinly sliced carrots (their sweetness goes well with the strawberries), pecans, goat cheese, and a balsamic vinaigrette. I like to make the vinaigrette with balsamic vinegar, olive oil, and a bit of honey.

Fennel salad with lemon – This month’s Cooking Light magazine has an entire section of Meyer lemon recipes – pick one up if you get the chance. This salad would be a great side dish for grilled or broiled fish.

Broiled grapefruit – Makes a lovely breakfast.

Chicken, Mushroom and Bok Choy Soup – The original calls for shiitake mushrooms, but just use what you get. And sub several of the planting onions for the green onions.

Raw collard wraps with avocado – I’ve stumbled across several different recipes for wraps that use raw collard leaves instead of lettuce or tortillas. It’s kind of genius if you think about it. The collards are a lot sturdier than lettuce, and healthier than a tortilla. Rather than point to one recipe or another, I’m just going to make this a California-style wrap, with diced avocado, grilled chicken, crumbled bacon, and shredded cheddar cheese. Use whatever veggie/protein combo you like.

*A note about planting onions: if you want to use these in your garden, just bury the white part and an inch or so of the green part of each onion in rich, organic soil, and go forth. I practice square foot gardening and will be planting 16 of these in one square foot (you’d be surprised how close together you can put many plants). If you’re interested in this method, I recommend checking out the book if you can get your hands on a copy. It’s not the best-written thing, but it’s detailed and has a lot of information. Another good, more general source of gardening info (but for Central Texas specifically) is The Natural Gardener’s information page. I especially like their month-by-month checklists.

-Stephanie