Tag Archives: bell peppers

Tilapia with Grilled Orange Vinaigrette

Because it has been in the 80s for about a week now (yay!), I’ve started reverting back to my warm-weather habit of cooking on the grill at least a few times per week. Today I really wanted to grill some fish, but I always run into the problem of fish sticking to the grill and falling apart once it’s cooked. I realized I could circumvent this issue, and cook some veggies along with the fish, if I put everything into a foil packet on the grill.

It worked wonderfully, and is easy to boot. I just put each fish fillet on a large piece of foil and topped them with a mixture of spinach, chard, and red bell pepper. For the vinaigrette, I added orange halves to the grill for the last five minutes of cooking, then mixed their juice with olive oil and herbs. I poured it over the cooked fish and greens, and voila – the perfect spring lunch.

Tilapia with Grilled Orange Vinaigrette

4 tilapia fillets
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tsp dried thyme
1/2 a large bunch of chard, chopped
~5 cups spinach, chopped
1/2 a large red bell pepper, chopped
Olive oil
2 oranges, halved
Handful of cilantro, chopped
1/2 a bunch of green onions (or green garlic), chopped

Preheat grill to medium heat (about 350 degrees). Season the fish with salt, pepper, and thyme. Place each in a large piece of foil sprayed with cooking spray and drizzle a bit of olive oil over each. Combine spinach, chard, and bell pepper and top each piece of fish with the mixture. Drizzle a bit more olive oil over the veggies, season with salt and pepper, and close up the foil packets to seal.

Place packets on grill and cook 20 minutes. Rub oranges with olive oil or cooking spray and place cut side down on the grill in the last five minutes of cooking.

While fish is cooking, combine cilantro, green onions, and 1/2 cup of olive oil in a bowl.

Remove everything from the grill. Squeeze orange juice into herb/oil mixture and season with salt and pepper. Stir well. Spoon a bit of the dressing over each fish fillet and serve.

– Stephanie

Advertisements

Five-Spice Pork Stew

This post comes to you from the French Quarter, where we are staying for a few nights on a much-needed vacation. We just inhaled lungfuls of powdered sugar at Cafe du Monde, and then ventured back to our hotel as the temperature slowly dropped. It’s supposed to be in the 30s tonight, and a warm stew like this is just what I look forward to on a cold evening.

I needed to use up a bunch of produce before we left and spotted a bag of five-spice powder in the pantry as I was gathering my ingredients. If you’ve never had it, five-spice powder is encompasses flavors of sweet, sour, bitter, pungent, and salty and usually contains fennel, cloves, cinnamon, star anise, and peppercorns. It is popular in Chinese cuisine, and sounded like just the thing to season my pork stew (I had just dug out a head of bok choy to use, and it just made sense). It’s flavor is pretty prominent here, so cut back on the amount you use if it seems like too much. I cooked this in a slow-cooker, but if you want to do it on the stove, just combine all ingredients, bring to a boil, and cook over low heat for about 2.5 hours, till the meat is tender.

We’re off to find a place to watch tonight’s Saints game. Adieu!

Five-Spice Pork Stew

2 lbs pork tenderloin (or your favorite cut of pork), cut into 1-inch pieces
1 lb green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 onion, chopped
1 jalapeno or other hot pepper, chopped (remove seeds for less heat)
3 bell peppers, chopped (I used two red and one green)
1 bunch bok choy, chopped
2 cups spinach, chopped
2 tsp minced ginger
1.5 tsp five-spice powder
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
4 cups chicken broth or water

Combine all ingredients in a slow cooker and stir well. Cook over high heat for 5.5 hours (or low heat for 10 hours).

Local Box Meal Plan: Dec. 6-10

Sorry for the delay in posting this, everyone. Did y’all see the size of the persimmons coming this week? Yum! Here’s this week’s box contents and video:

Butternut squash – Gundermann
Persimmons – Oasis Gardens
Salad mix – My Father’s Farm
Assorted peppers – Lundgren
Oriental turnips – Acadian
Meyer lemons – G&S Groves
Collard greens – My Father’s Farm
Sweet potatoes – Gundermann
French breakfast radishes – Acadian

I will be making:

Lemon bars – The video mentioned making lemon bars with our Meyer lemons, and I suddenly couldn’t imagine doing anything else with them.

Persimmon squash pie – You can freeze extra squash puree to use in soups and other recipes later.

Honey-roasted root vegetables – I’ve made this several times, and I never get tired of it. Use a combo of radishes, sweet potatoes, and turnips here. (Yes, you can roast radishes. I posted about it here last week.) Leftovers of these would be a great addition to salads made with your salad mix.

Cajun chicken with collard greens – Use whatever sweet peppers you get if you don’t get a red pepper. I’d add more than one, too.

Local Box Meal Plan: Nov. 15-19

Can you believe Thanksgiving is next week? I’ll come up with some T-giving-appropriate recipes using Local Box ingredients in this and next week’s posts.

Here’s our full list, with the video following it:

Fuji or Cameo Apples – Apple Country
Butternut Squash- Gundermann Farms
Persimmons – Acadian
Sweet Peppers – Lundgren
Cilantro – Acadian
Limes – G&S
Sweet Corn – J&B
Oriental Turnips – Acadian
Yellow Onions – Naegelin
Beets – My Father’s Farm

I will be making:

Apple-persimmon cake – This would be a great Thanksgiving dessert. It’s vegan, too!

Tsimmes with beets, turnips, and beef – Tsimmes isn’t plural for anything, in case you were wondering – it’s a traditional Ashkenazi Jewish stew. I’ll use fewer carrots and more turnips here (or maybe even all turnips and no carrots, but I’m not sure it would still be a tsimmes at that point). You won’t use all of your beets in this recipe, so roast and peel the rest to use in salads during the week.

Butternut squash with ginger and cilantro – Would be a great Thanksgiving side dish. I love the addition of a little crystallized ginger, which you can usually find in the baking aisle.

Chipotle turkey cutlets with charred corn salsa – Ok, this may be better as a post-Thanksgiving way to use up leftover turkey, but you can just use chicken instead if you want.

Local Box Meal Plan: Nov. 1-5

We’re going to start putting the Local Box videos here to accompany the meal plans. Hopefully it’ll help you to have the video in the same place as the meal plan in case you have a question about what an ingredient looks like.

We can’t embed Facebook videos here, but here’s the link to this week’s video. If you don’t feel like watching, here’s the list of ingredients:

Granny Smith or Cameo Apples – Apple Country (or turnips)
Summer Squash- Naegelin
Green Beans – Animal Farm
Baby Arugula – Montesino
Cucumbers – Acadian
Green Shallots – Acadian
Bell Peppers – Acadian
Okra – Bradshaw
Marrs Oranges – G&S Groves
Spanish Black Radish – My Father’s Farm

So, I’m making:

Korean radish salad – Use your green shallots in place of the scallions here. This recipe’s at the bottom of a page full of Spanish black radish recipes, many of which look tasty. I also want to try the remoulade and the radish, carrot, and fennel salad with pecorino cheese.

Ginger beer cocktail – Marrs oranges often have seeds, so use a strainer when you’re squeezing the juice out of them. Leave out the apple if you get turnips this week.

Okra and green beans – This recipe looks tasty, but I’m also intrigued by the “Turn this recipe into a puzzle!” link. It literally turns the recipe into a puzzle – specifically, a word search.

Veggie pizza – Sauteed diced squash, bell peppers, and any other veggies you want until they’re tender. Spread red or white sauce on a pre-made pizza crust, and top with veggies, arugula, (and meat, if you want) and cheese. Bake until the crust is browned and the cheese is bubbly.

Local Box Meal Plan: Oct. 11-15

This week, we’re getting:

Bell peppers – Lundgren
Mixed baby greens – My Father’s Farm
Herb – Pure Luck
Apples – Apple Country
Cucumbers – Acadian
Okra – Acadian
Summer squash – Naegelin
Braising greens goody bag (collards, chard, and the like) – My Father’s Farm
Green shallots – Acadian

I’ll be making:

Side salads with mixed greens, cucumbers, and bell peppers, with this green shallot vinaigrette (the recipe calls for green onions, but the two are pretty interchangeable)

Mom’s summer squash – Not my mom, Elise’s (from Simply Recipes) mom. This recipe will use one of your bell peppers and an onion from the stash you got last week.

LBJ Ranch pickled okra – It’s about that time of year when I start putting up okra for the winter. This recipe looks like the one I used last year, which I couldn’t seem to dig up. You can skip the hot peppers if you wish; I never taste them (but I also have a very high tolerance for spiciness, so trust your instincts on this one). Also, if you don’t want to actually can the pickles by processing them in boiling water, just put the jars in the fridge. These need to sit for at least six weeks before you eat them.

Chicken with rosemary, apples, and onions – This recipe uses a slow cooker. If you don’t have one, add two more cups of broth, cover, and cook over low heat on the stovetop for a couple of hours, until the chicken falls off of the bone. (I spotted rosemary in the Local Box video, which is why I’m featuring it here. If you get another herb and need ideas on how to use it, leave a comment and I’ll come up with something for you.)

Quick-braised greens with bacon – The original recipe calls for just collards, but your mixed goody bag of braising greens will work just fine. You can leave out the onion if you’re out of them; the bacon adds a ton of flavor on its own. Use center-cut bacon for a slightly lower-fat version.

Chicken and Pepper Stir-Fry with Mint

This is a good weeknight stir-fry, and some chopped mint and toasted almonds add a nice twist. The original recipe calls for pork, which is good (I’ve made this with pork before), but I had some ground chicken so I used that instead, and it turned out great. You can skip the step where you toast the almonds if you need to save time, but they really do taste better that way.

Chicken and Pepper Stir-Fry with Mint

Marinade:
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 tablespoon brown sugar
2 tablespoons olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Stir Fry:
1 lb ground chicken
5 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 tablespoons finely chopped ginger
1 tablespoon hot chile paste (like Sriracha)
5 tablespoons teriyaki sauce
6 small bell peppers, cut into strips
salt and pepper to taste
1/4 cup blanched slivered almonds
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint

In a large ziploc bag, mix together rice wine vinegar, garlic, brown sugar, olive oil, and salt and pepper. Add chicken, cover, and marinate for at least 1/2 hour and up to 8 hours.

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Toast almonds in hot, dry skillet until golden brown and fragrant, about five minutes. Stir often and keep your eye on them because they burn easily. Remove almonds to a plate.

Heat oil in skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in marinated chicken, ginger, and chile paste. Mix in teriyaki sauce, and increase heat to high. Cook, stirring constantly, until chicken is white. Stir in peppers, and continue to stir fry until most of the liquid has evaporated and chicken is cooked. Top with toasted almond slivers and fresh mint. Serve over cooked brown rice or quinoa.