Tag Archives: bok choy

Local Box Meal Plan: May 2-6

I hope everyone’s been enjoying the cool weather we’ve had the last few days. I know the cool-weather veggies like lettuce and kale are!

Yellow Onion – Naegelin
Kohlrabi – Tecolote Farm
Curly Kale – Texas Natural
Bok Choy – Texas Daily Harvest
Red Beets – Acadian Family Farm
Spring Onions – Gundermann Acres
Red Radish – Massey
Limes – G&S Groves
Romaine Lettuce – Bar W
Red Leaf Lettuce – Acadian Family Farm

Bok choy stir-fry – It’s the fifth recipe on this page (which includes a ton of other bok choy recipes if you want more options). Use the spring onion tops as the green onions, and add sliced spring onions to the recipe when you add the bok choy.

Beet and kale penne pasta – I bet this is a gorgeous color when it’s finished.

Kohlrabi and radish salad – The recipe calls for daikon radish, but we’ve already learned that any radish tastes awesome roasted, so use the ones you get.

Chicken coconut soup with kale and curry – Love the fresh flavors in this soup.

– Stephanie

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Local Box Meal Plan: March 14-18

Happy Last Average Frost Day in Central Texas! We continue our march toward spring with more slicing tomatoes this week, along with some tasty cool weather produce.

Slicing Tomatoes – Gundermann
Lettuce Heads – Fruitful Farm
Spinach – Naegelin Farm
Mustard Greens – Gundermann
Shallot Scallions – Lund Produce
Navel Oranges OR Grapefruit – G&S Grove
Bok Choy OR Green Cabbage OR Collard Greens – Naegelin Farm
Green Garlic – Texas Daily Harvest
Multicolored Carrots OR Beets – Animal Farm

Stuffed tomatoes – These are filled with a cheesy spinach mixture. I’ll add chopped shallot scallions or green garlic for more flavor.

Mustard greens with honey orange vinaigrette – Use grapefruit instead of oranges if you get them, and add sliced green garlic or shallot scallions.

Chicken lettuce wraps – If you’re looking for something to do with your lettuce besides make salad. You can leave out the carrots if you don’t get them, but I think it would be tasty to add some chopped collards, cabbage, or bok choy to the mix, whichever you get.

If you get beets, this honey-balsamic beet recipe looks awesome.

– Stephanie

Local Box Meal Plan: Feb. 21-25

I am so, so excited about getting strawberries this week. What a rare local treat! Here’s the full list, video, and menu plan.

Strawberries – Gunderman Farm
Avocado – G&S Grove
Spinach – Orange Blossom
Planting Onions* – Orange Blossom
Collard Greens – Gunderman Farm
Fennel – J&B Farm
Mushrooms – Kitchen Pride
Bok Choy – Gunderman Farm
Grapefruits – G&S Grove
Meyer Lemons – G&S Grove
Multicolored Carrots – Animal Farm

Strawberry and spinach salad – I like to savor the first strawberries of the season in all their fresh, raw glory, and they have a natural affinity for spinach. Mix sliced strawberries with roughly chopped spinach, thinly sliced carrots (their sweetness goes well with the strawberries), pecans, goat cheese, and a balsamic vinaigrette. I like to make the vinaigrette with balsamic vinegar, olive oil, and a bit of honey.

Fennel salad with lemon – This month’s Cooking Light magazine has an entire section of Meyer lemon recipes – pick one up if you get the chance. This salad would be a great side dish for grilled or broiled fish.

Broiled grapefruit – Makes a lovely breakfast.

Chicken, Mushroom and Bok Choy Soup – The original calls for shiitake mushrooms, but just use what you get. And sub several of the planting onions for the green onions.

Raw collard wraps with avocado – I’ve stumbled across several different recipes for wraps that use raw collard leaves instead of lettuce or tortillas. It’s kind of genius if you think about it. The collards are a lot sturdier than lettuce, and healthier than a tortilla. Rather than point to one recipe or another, I’m just going to make this a California-style wrap, with diced avocado, grilled chicken, crumbled bacon, and shredded cheddar cheese. Use whatever veggie/protein combo you like.

*A note about planting onions: if you want to use these in your garden, just bury the white part and an inch or so of the green part of each onion in rich, organic soil, and go forth. I practice square foot gardening and will be planting 16 of these in one square foot (you’d be surprised how close together you can put many plants). If you’re interested in this method, I recommend checking out the book if you can get your hands on a copy. It’s not the best-written thing, but it’s detailed and has a lot of information. Another good, more general source of gardening info (but for Central Texas specifically) is The Natural Gardener’s information page. I especially like their month-by-month checklists.

-Stephanie

Local Box Meal Plan: Jan. 10-14

This week, I’m especially excited about the red Russian kale. If you’ve never had it before, be sure to give it a big sniff before you cook it – it has a wonderful, floral fragrance.

Tangerines – Orange Blossom
Green Onions – Naegelin
Red Beets
Various Lettuce – Acadian
Daikon Radish – My Father’s Farm
Bok Choy – Naegelin
Cauliflower – J&B
Apples – Apple Country
Red Russian Kale – Acadian
Butternut Squash or Avocados

I’m making:

Pork tenderloin stir-fry with tangerines and chili sauce

Herb-poached shrimp with cauliflower couscous and brown butter – This has a long ingredient list, but looks really yummy.

Braised kale with pancetta – Keepin’ it simple. The kale shines here.

Roasted butternut squash with sauteed beets and beet greens – You can leave out the squash if you get avocados instead.

Apple-avocado salad with tangerine dressing – This would be good without the avocados if you get squash instead.

Five-Spice Pork Stew

This post comes to you from the French Quarter, where we are staying for a few nights on a much-needed vacation. We just inhaled lungfuls of powdered sugar at Cafe du Monde, and then ventured back to our hotel as the temperature slowly dropped. It’s supposed to be in the 30s tonight, and a warm stew like this is just what I look forward to on a cold evening.

I needed to use up a bunch of produce before we left and spotted a bag of five-spice powder in the pantry as I was gathering my ingredients. If you’ve never had it, five-spice powder is encompasses flavors of sweet, sour, bitter, pungent, and salty and usually contains fennel, cloves, cinnamon, star anise, and peppercorns. It is popular in Chinese cuisine, and sounded like just the thing to season my pork stew (I had just dug out a head of bok choy to use, and it just made sense). It’s flavor is pretty prominent here, so cut back on the amount you use if it seems like too much. I cooked this in a slow-cooker, but if you want to do it on the stove, just combine all ingredients, bring to a boil, and cook over low heat for about 2.5 hours, till the meat is tender.

We’re off to find a place to watch tonight’s Saints game. Adieu!

Five-Spice Pork Stew

2 lbs pork tenderloin (or your favorite cut of pork), cut into 1-inch pieces
1 lb green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 onion, chopped
1 jalapeno or other hot pepper, chopped (remove seeds for less heat)
3 bell peppers, chopped (I used two red and one green)
1 bunch bok choy, chopped
2 cups spinach, chopped
2 tsp minced ginger
1.5 tsp five-spice powder
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
4 cups chicken broth or water

Combine all ingredients in a slow cooker and stir well. Cook over high heat for 5.5 hours (or low heat for 10 hours).

Local Box Meal Plan, Nov. 29-Dec. 3

Hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving! We have a couple of pretty veggies coming this week, in the form of multicolored carrots (kids love eating purple carrots) and watermelon radishes, which are red on the inside and green on the outside. Here’s the full list.

Bok choy – Naegelin
Tangerines – Oasis Gardens
Bibb lettuce or mixed baby greens – My Father’s Farm
Green beans – Naegelin
Turnip greens – Acadian
Watermelon radishes – Fruitful Farm
Sweet Italian peppers – Lundgren
Multicolored carrots – Animal Farm
Cilantro – Acadian

I’ll be making:

Watermelon radish salad with cilantro – This lets the pretty radishes shine. Sub your lettuce for the romaine. Also, instead of the avocado dressing originally called for, whip up a citrus vinaigrette with some tangerine juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper. I bet throwing in some tangerine sections would be good, too.

Bok choy, carrot, and green bean stir-fry – I’m taking this general idea and heavily adapting it. Double the ingredients (the recipe says it serves six, but, looking at the amounts it calls for, I don’t buy it). Add more soy sauce. I’m also going to up the protein content by stir-frying cubed chicken or pork (seasoned with salt and pepper) before adding the veggies, so you’ll need to use more oil. Tofu would be yummy, too. Finally, I’ll probably throw in some chopped cilantro at the end, and serve everything over brown rice or another whole grain.

Hot wilted greens – Add chopped Italian peppers to the onion mixture. I love the addition of balsamic vinegar and pecans here.

Smoky Chickpea Soup

I think I have the only toddler in the US who refuses to eat chicken nuggets. An entire pint of strawberries in one sitting? No problem (and so much for that pie I was going to make). But a toddler finger-food staple? Just one bite? Well, that’s just ridiculous.

I’d never even made them at home until last night, when I came across a recipe for chicken nuggets breaded with almond meal instead of breadcrumbs that sounded interesting. They tasted just like regular chicken nuggets, but it was a no-go.

Tonight we resorted to bribery. It went like this:

Us: “Ryan, if you eat your chicken you can have some cake!”
Ryan: “No!”

Us: “Ryan, if you eat your chicken you can have your orange!”
Ryan: “No!”

And so on. It did not work. So tomorrow night, I’m going to serve this soup and hope for better results. If kiddie-style chicken’s not cutting it, we’ll just go with a more adult chicken dish and see what happens.

There’s much to love about this soup. Inspired by several Greenling veggies I needed to use, it’s stuffed with vegetables, chickpeas, and chicken, and gets a wonderful smoky flavor from smoked paprika. It also comes together quickly on a weeknight. It would taste great without the chicken and with vegetable broth for a vegetarian version.

Smoky Chickpea Soup

2 tbsp olive oil
2 cloves garlic, chopped (about 1 tsp)
1 bunch spring onion bulbs, thinly sliced (reserve the tops for garnish)
1 bunch bok choy, chopped
2 cups finely chopped kale
1 cup mushrooms, sliced
3 cooked chicken breasts, chopped (about 3-4 cups)
1 15-oz can chickpeas
1 15-oz can fire-roasted tomatoes*
2 cups chicken broth
2 tsp smoked paprika
Salt and pepper to taste

*ETA: I just got a question about this so I wanted to clarify — you don’t have to actually roast canned tomatoes yourself (unless you are so inclined). Muir Glen is a popular brand of canned organic fire-roasted tomatoes and the only brand I knew of until last weekend, when I spotted an HEB version that’s cheaper. It’s not organic, but it’s a choice. Anyway, on to the recipe.

Instructions

Heat olive oil over medium-high heat in a Dutch oven. Add onions and garlic and cook about 5 minutes, until onions soften. Add remaining ingredients, seasoning with salt and pepper to taste, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes, until greens or softened. Garnish with chopped spring onion tops. Serve with crusty bread to soak up the rich broth.