Tag Archives: green beans

Green Beans with Sweet and Sour Onions

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This recipe comes from my friend Amy’s blog – she who also brought you that cheesy polenta with chard several weeks back. These beans and onions are no health food, as they’re cooked in generous amounts of buttah. And yes, I meant to spell it buttah. But hey, sometimes it’s ok to indulge a bit, especially when we’re talking about fancy-ing up humble veggies like green beans and red onions.

The flavors here are complex, but the recipe is easy. If you don’t like spicy food, leave out the red pepper.

Green Beans with Sweet and Sour Onions (adapted from Adventures of a Messy Chef)

1 pound green beans, trimmed
3 tablespoons butter
1 large red onion, peeled, halved lengthwise, sliced lengthwise
1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
1/3 cup red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper

Boil the green beans until crisp-tender, about 7 minutes. Transfer to a bowl.

Melt butter over high heat in the pot you cooked the beans in. Add onions, oregano, and red pepper. Sauté until onion begins to soften and becomes translucent, about 4 minutes. Add vinegar and sugar. Stir until sauce thickens, about 1 1/2 minutes. Add beans; toss to coat and heat through, about 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.

– Stephanie

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Local Box Meal Plan: May 30-June 3

I know lots of people around here complain about the sweltering summer heat, but for the most part, I kind of like it. I’m a native Texan, so I’m sure that has something to do with it, but beyond the heat summer means iced sweet tea, swimming pools, and Local Boxes filled with stuff like peaches, green beans, and tomatoes. It’s just hard to beat all of that.

Peaches – Caskey Orchards 
Leeks – Bar W
Zephyr & Gold Zucchini Squash – Texas Natural 
New Potatoes – Naegelin Farm 
White Onion – Gundermann Acres 
Carrots – Acadian Family Farm
Pickling Cucumbers – Acadian Family Farm
Green Beans – Acadian Family Farm OR Tecolote Farm
Green Tomatoes – Fruitful Hill Farm
Leaf or Romaine Lettuce – Acadian Family Farm

 

Spicy dill refrigerator pickles – This recipe has a handy calculator that’ll help you figure out how to adjust the recipe for the number of cucumbers you get.

Green bean, potato, and leek salad – We probably won’t get four leeks, so use white onions instead.

Summer squash casserole – I like the idea of this casserole, but will use butter instead of margarine and lower the amount by at least half. You rarely need an entire cup of butter in a non-bakery recipe.

Open-face bacon, lettuce, and fried green tomato sandwiches – Oh yes. Just….yes. Use whatever lettuce you get instead of the Bibb.

Skillet pork chop saute with peaches – I like the sweet and savory combo of flavors here. Plus, this recipe is pretty fast – last time I made it, it took about half an hour.

Local Box Meal Plan: April 25-29

Well, hello heirloom tomatoes. So nice to see you again! If you’ve been sweltering in the 90-degree days we’ve been having lately, at least take heart in the fact that the heat is helping local tomato crops.

Spring Lettuce Mix – Tecolote Farm
Chard – Bradshaw Farm
Brussels Sprouts OR Green Beans – Hillside Farm OR Naegelin Farm
Summer Squash – Acadian Family Farm
New Potatoes – Green Gate Farms
Flat Leaf Parsley – Tecolote Farm
Heirloom Tomatoes – Bluebonnet Hydroponic
Mango – G&S Groves
Crisp Green Leaf Lettuce – Lund Produce Company

Tangy herbed lettuce soup – I told you last week I’d find you a lettuce soup recipe! This one even uses up some of the potatoes you’ll get this week. Use the green leaf lettuce you get for this recipe, and stick with using the spring mix in salads. Also, use parsley instead of basil (unless you happen to have basil on hand, in which case I’d use both).

Tomato-squash skillet – I usually don’t cook heirloom tomatoes because they have such an amazing raw flavor, but if you’re tired of salads and don’t feel like eating them raw this week, try this recipe. I might add a few chickpeas to round out the protein here and make it a vegan main course, or mix in some diced, cooked chicken if you eat meat.

Chard-mango smoothie – What? Chard in a smoothie? I know! Sounds weird, but I’m a fan of spinach in smoothies and this isn’t far off. Just give it a shot if you’re skeptical – I think you’ll be surprised at how non-chardy it tastes. I would add about a cup of a liquid to this recipe, maybe some almond milk or orange juice. 

For the brussels sprouts and green beans, I’m thinking a nice turn on the grill would work for both – I’m loving grilled veggies these days. Grease a grill wok and add the veggies tossed in some olive oil and your favorite seasonings (I’ve been using lemon pepper lately). Grill over medium-high heat until tender, around 10 minutes, stirring often to keep the ones on the bottom from burning. Make sure to trim the green beans or halve the brussels sprouts before cooking. If you don’t have a grill wok, just put the veggies on a big piece of aluminum foil on the grill, or use your broiler instead.

– Stephanie

Five-Spice Pork Stew

This post comes to you from the French Quarter, where we are staying for a few nights on a much-needed vacation. We just inhaled lungfuls of powdered sugar at Cafe du Monde, and then ventured back to our hotel as the temperature slowly dropped. It’s supposed to be in the 30s tonight, and a warm stew like this is just what I look forward to on a cold evening.

I needed to use up a bunch of produce before we left and spotted a bag of five-spice powder in the pantry as I was gathering my ingredients. If you’ve never had it, five-spice powder is encompasses flavors of sweet, sour, bitter, pungent, and salty and usually contains fennel, cloves, cinnamon, star anise, and peppercorns. It is popular in Chinese cuisine, and sounded like just the thing to season my pork stew (I had just dug out a head of bok choy to use, and it just made sense). It’s flavor is pretty prominent here, so cut back on the amount you use if it seems like too much. I cooked this in a slow-cooker, but if you want to do it on the stove, just combine all ingredients, bring to a boil, and cook over low heat for about 2.5 hours, till the meat is tender.

We’re off to find a place to watch tonight’s Saints game. Adieu!

Five-Spice Pork Stew

2 lbs pork tenderloin (or your favorite cut of pork), cut into 1-inch pieces
1 lb green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 onion, chopped
1 jalapeno or other hot pepper, chopped (remove seeds for less heat)
3 bell peppers, chopped (I used two red and one green)
1 bunch bok choy, chopped
2 cups spinach, chopped
2 tsp minced ginger
1.5 tsp five-spice powder
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
4 cups chicken broth or water

Combine all ingredients in a slow cooker and stir well. Cook over high heat for 5.5 hours (or low heat for 10 hours).

Local Box Meal Plan, Nov. 29-Dec. 3

Hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving! We have a couple of pretty veggies coming this week, in the form of multicolored carrots (kids love eating purple carrots) and watermelon radishes, which are red on the inside and green on the outside. Here’s the full list.

Bok choy – Naegelin
Tangerines – Oasis Gardens
Bibb lettuce or mixed baby greens – My Father’s Farm
Green beans – Naegelin
Turnip greens – Acadian
Watermelon radishes – Fruitful Farm
Sweet Italian peppers – Lundgren
Multicolored carrots – Animal Farm
Cilantro – Acadian

I’ll be making:

Watermelon radish salad with cilantro – This lets the pretty radishes shine. Sub your lettuce for the romaine. Also, instead of the avocado dressing originally called for, whip up a citrus vinaigrette with some tangerine juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper. I bet throwing in some tangerine sections would be good, too.

Bok choy, carrot, and green bean stir-fry – I’m taking this general idea and heavily adapting it. Double the ingredients (the recipe says it serves six, but, looking at the amounts it calls for, I don’t buy it). Add more soy sauce. I’m also going to up the protein content by stir-frying cubed chicken or pork (seasoned with salt and pepper) before adding the veggies, so you’ll need to use more oil. Tofu would be yummy, too. Finally, I’ll probably throw in some chopped cilantro at the end, and serve everything over brown rice or another whole grain.

Hot wilted greens – Add chopped Italian peppers to the onion mixture. I love the addition of balsamic vinegar and pecans here.

Local Box Meal Plan: Nov. 8-12

Lots of variety this week – looks like a good mix of summer, fall, and winter produce. We’re getting:

Granny Smith or Cameo Apples – Apple Country
Summer Squash- Texas Natural
Green Beans – Animal
Cucumbers – Acadian
Green Shallots – Acadian
Green Cabbage – Naegelin
Swiss Chard – Acadian
Grapefruit – G&S Groves
Basil – Urban Roots
Cilantro – My Father’s Farm
Sweet Potatoes – Naegelin

Here’s this week’s video if you need a visual:

I will be making:

Asian sweet potato chowder – Can you say YUM? Sweet potatoes, cilantro, green shallots (subbed for the green onions), and coconut milk form a creamy soup. If you don’t want to mess with fresh ginger, just use the jarred, minced ginger found in the Asian food aisle. Use vegetable broth instead of chicken broth here, and this is vegan.

Apple-cabbage slaw – Serve with pork chops.

Tortellini soup – Use trimmed fresh green beans instead of frozen, add chopped Swiss chard, and use fresh basil instead of dried. You’ll probably need to add some extra broth or water to account for the extra veggies, and simmer at least 15 minutes until the green beans are tender. Also, I think this would be good without the ground beef, or with sauteed chicken instead.

Couscous and cucumber salad – Serve with broiled chicken. You can easily leave out the parsley if you don’t have it – the basil will provide enough flavor on its own.

Broiled grapefruit – This tasty breakfast recipe uses brown sugar and butter to create a sweet, crunchy topping much like the top of creme brulee – perfect on a cool morning.

Local Box Meal Plan: Nov. 1-5

We’re going to start putting the Local Box videos here to accompany the meal plans. Hopefully it’ll help you to have the video in the same place as the meal plan in case you have a question about what an ingredient looks like.

We can’t embed Facebook videos here, but here’s the link to this week’s video. If you don’t feel like watching, here’s the list of ingredients:

Granny Smith or Cameo Apples – Apple Country (or turnips)
Summer Squash- Naegelin
Green Beans – Animal Farm
Baby Arugula – Montesino
Cucumbers – Acadian
Green Shallots – Acadian
Bell Peppers – Acadian
Okra – Bradshaw
Marrs Oranges – G&S Groves
Spanish Black Radish – My Father’s Farm

So, I’m making:

Korean radish salad – Use your green shallots in place of the scallions here. This recipe’s at the bottom of a page full of Spanish black radish recipes, many of which look tasty. I also want to try the remoulade and the radish, carrot, and fennel salad with pecorino cheese.

Ginger beer cocktail – Marrs oranges often have seeds, so use a strainer when you’re squeezing the juice out of them. Leave out the apple if you get turnips this week.

Okra and green beans – This recipe looks tasty, but I’m also intrigued by the “Turn this recipe into a puzzle!” link. It literally turns the recipe into a puzzle – specifically, a word search.

Veggie pizza – Sauteed diced squash, bell peppers, and any other veggies you want until they’re tender. Spread red or white sauce on a pre-made pizza crust, and top with veggies, arugula, (and meat, if you want) and cheese. Bake until the crust is browned and the cheese is bubbly.