Tag Archives: mushroom

Spinach Stuffed Mushrooms

Image by Norwich Nuts. Licensed for commercial use under Creative Commons.

Stuffed mushrooms are an easy appetizer and a holiday classic. This recipe calls for local mushrooms and Parmesan, fresh spinach, and our kitchen’s signature Garlic Herb Butter. We’re sure you won’t be able to just eat one.

Although this recipe calls for local white mushrooms and spinach, which are the most budget-friendly option now, it will work will equally well with other small mushrooms and winter greensРjust choose whatever  is handy.

Spinach Stuffed Mushrooms (yields about 18 mushrooms)
1 pound white button mushrooms
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon organic olive oil, divided
1 tablespoon Garlic Herb butter
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons shredded Parmesan Cheese
1/2 bunch spinach, including stems, finely chopped
salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Brush dirt off of mushrooms and remove stems from the caps. Mince the stems and set aside for later use. Coat a baking sheet with a teaspoon olive oil. Bake the mushroom caps, stem-side down, until just tender, about 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the herb butter and remaining oil in a medium sized skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and mushroom stems and cook, stirring frequently, for 3 to 5 minutes. Add the spinach and cook for 2 to 3 minutes more, until spinach is just wilted.

Transfer spinach mixture to a bowl and season with salt and pepper. Once mushrooms are par-cooked, remove them from the oven and use tongs to turn each mushroom cam stem-side up. Spoon the spinach mixture into mushroom caps, and top each with a pinch of parmesan cheese. Return to the oven and bake until golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes.

This dish is part of our Organic Entertaining on a Budget series. A complete menu of recipes is available here.

Advertisements

Meatless Monday: Slow Cooker Veggie Lasagna

Vegetable lasagna is one of my favorite cold weather comfort foods, especially when autumn vegetables like zucchini are abundant. It’s a great meatless main dish, too, because it is filling and pairs perfectly with a quick salad. However, it can be difficult to make lasagna on weeknights since the traditional preparation is so time consuming– up to an hour of hands-on time!

This easy vegetable lasagna recipe avoids many of the pitfalls of traditional preparation by utilizing some useful short-cuts to save time.¬† Instead of parboiling the noodles and assembling the casserole in a baking dish, we’ll layer sauce, cheese, veggies and raw lasagna noodles right in a slow cooker. Since the slow cooker retains more moisture than traditional oven cooking, there is enough liquid in the casserole to completely cook the noodles right in the dish. There’s no need to use special no-boil noodles, either. Plain raw lasagna noodles are just fine.

Another time saver I like to use for this recipe is my food processor. I use the grater attachment to process my raw veggies for the dish in much less time than it would take to grate or dice them by hand. These veggies blend right into the pasta sauce of the lasagna and give the dish a rich texture and flavor, without adding distinguishable chunks of vegetables. If your family likes chunkier veggie lasagna, by all means cook the recipe as directed with chopped veggies an it will turn out great. Either way, the total prep time for this lasagna should take less than half an hour.

Slow Cooker Vegetable Lasagna (serves 8 )
adapted from “Slow Cooker Lasagna” by BettyCrocker.com

15-ounces ricotta cheeese
1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
1 egg
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon garlic powder
2 cups shredded vegetables: your choice of onions, broccoli, zucchini, mushrooms, peppers, or greens. One large zucchini and half of a large onion yield about 2 cups.
10 lasagna noodles, about 1/2 of a 1 lb. package
24-ounce jar organic pasta sauce
1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

In a large bowl, mix together ricotta cheese, Parmesan cheese, egg, oregano, and garlic powder.

Shred or chop the vegetables of your choice. Break the lasagna noodles into approximately 1/3-noodle sized pieces with your hands, so that they will fit easily into the crock pot.

Use a ladle to scoop about 1 cup of sauce into the slow cooker. Place a single layer of noodles on the sauce. Layer 1 cup of shredded vegetables on top of the noodles, followed by half of the ricotta cheese mixture. Repeat the sauce-noodle-vegetable-cheese layers. Cover this with the remaining noodles. Ladle the remaining sauce over the casserole and sprinkle mozzarella cheese over the top. Cover and cook on low for 4-6 hours, until noodles are tender and most of the liquid in the casserole has been absorbed.

Local Box Meal Plan: March 8-12

This week, we’re getting collards or spinach and an onion from Naegelin, shiitake or white button mushrooms from Kitchen Pride, grapefruit from G&S Groves, red leaf lettuce and arugula from Bluebonnet Hydroponics, spring onions from Acadian, cilantro and radish from My Father’s Farm, and either cabbage, carrots or beets (fingers crossed for beets!).

So I’m making:

We’ve been getting so much grapefruit lately and I’m running out of ideas (and I’ll go nuts if I have to eat any more for breakfast!). What have you been doing with grapefruit?

Local Box Meal Plan: Feb. 8-12

I tried making a turnip puree last week, and while the flavor was good, it seemed a bit like eating baby food. So I think I’ll stick with roasting them for now. Anyone have any great turnip recipes?

This week, we’re getting a huge head of Napa cabbage from Farm Patch; spinach from Naegelin; lettuce from Bluebonnet Hydroponics; meyer lemons from G&S Groves; turnips, cilantro and green shallots from Acadian; baby bok choy leaves from My Father’s Farm; and mushrooms from Kitchen Pride.

So I’m making:

Dinner:

Side dishes:

Local Box Meal Plan: Jan. 25-29

Better late than never, right? We’re getting our Greenling box this afternoon (shoot, I forgot to put the empty box outside this morning!), and as always, it’s got some nice winter-y goodies for us.

This week, we’re getting broccoli, pac choi, baby collards, and turnips from My Father’s Farm; lettuce from Animal Farm; oranges from G&S Groves; cilantro and red spring onion from Acadian; tomatoes from Village Organics; and white button mushrooms from Kitchen Pride.

So I’m making:

Lunch:

  • Tuna salad on a bed of…salad?

Dinner:

Side Dish:

I’ll also make some fresh-squeezed OJ with waffles for Sunday breakfast.

Slow Cooker Goat “Bourguignon”

A few weeks ago, I picked up some goat meat on a whim at the Pearl Brewery farmer’s market in San Antonio. I had been reading a lot about it, but found it in local grocery stores. I’m so glad I tried it; I am now a total convert and preach the marvels of goat to anyone who will listen.

It was frozen (for food safety reasons, most of the meat sold at the farmer’s market is frozen), so using the slow-cooker was a great solution. If it wasn’t frozen, I would have browned the goat in some bacon fat before putting in the slow-cooker. This by no means is a traditional “bourguignon,” but it uses many of the same flavors. I kind of just dumped whatever reminded me of traditional boeuf bourguignon in the slow-cooker.

This is the kind of dish into which you can add whatever comes in your Local Box that week. Last time I made this with green garlic and red spring onions; this time I had a ton of carrots and used the pattypan squash. If you have mushrooms, those would be fabulous too. I’ve included the basic recipe, but the intent is that you improvise with whatever’s in season/on hand.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch of carrots, peeled and chopped into medium-sized chunks
  • 1 large onion or a few spring onions (either red or yellow, though I used red) chopped
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp. fresh thyme, chopped
  • 1/2 bottle red wine (I used a French burgundy.)
  • 1-14 oz. can low-sodium beef stock
  • 1-6 oz. can tomato paste
  • 1 lb. goat stew meat
  • 1/2 tsp. salt and a few grinds of pepper

Directions:

  • Put the chopped vegetables and the herbs in the bottom of the slow-cooker, then add the tomato paste and liquids and stir well.
  • Add the goat so that all of the pieces are covered in the liquid, then add the salt and pepper.
  • Cover and cook on high for 3 hours, then on low for 2 hours (alternatively, low for 8 hours — 9 if it’s frozen — would be okay also).

Verdict:
This was PHENOMENAL. I’ve made boeuf bourguignon in the slow-cooker before using a similar recipe, but the goat was much more moist and flavorful. The goat was more flavorful than beef, but not game-y at all. I served this with garlic mashed potatoes (saute ~3 cloves of garlic in butter, then add milk or buttermilk to the skillet to heat through, then add to the boiled potatoes and whisk everything in a stand mixer until smooth), so it was nice to have so much sauce with it, but if you want a thicker gravy, stir about 1 tsp. cornstarch into the beef stock before adding to the slow-cooker.

Local Box Lookout, week of 04.20.2009

Here’s what to expect in this week’s Local Box:

  • Swiss chard
  • cabbage
  • herbs
  • mushrooms
  • spring onion
  • garlic scapes
  • carrots
  • zucchini
  • turnips
  • berries