Tag Archives: Vegetarian

Meatless Monday: Curried Sprouted Lentils w/ Ginger & Garlic Cilantro Sauce

From TheNourishingGourmet.com

Makes 4-6 servings

If you’re getting a Local Box this week, you’ve already got Sprouted Lentils coming your way! If not, you can add them to your basket individually too– they are nutrient packed and local from Groovy Greens in Blanco, TX.

Make the flavorful raw cilantro sauce while the lentils are cooking. Since it’s Hatch season, try throwing a Hatch Chile in place of the Anaheim for some extra heat.

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Curried Sprouted Lentils with a Ginger and Garlic Cilantro Sauce

About 3 cups of sprouted lentils and 3 cups of sprouted wheat, or another 3 cups of sprouted lentils (this is measured loosely, i.e. I didn’t press the sprouts down at all)
2 tablespoons of coconut oil or olive oil
1 onion, chopped
3 garlic cloves
1 tablespoon curry powder
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
2 cups of water

In a large saucepan with a lid, heat oil over medium high heat until hot, but not smoking. Add onions and cook while stirring for about 4 minutes, until the onion is starting to soften. Then add the garlic, curry powder and cloves and cook for about 30 seconds longer and add the water.

Then add the lentils (and optional wheat, if using). Bring to a simmer with the lid on, then lower heat. Steam for 15-20 minutes until soft. If just using lentils, you can steam for even a little less.

Meanwhile, make your cilantro sauce.
1 bunch of cilantro, stemmed and washed
Either half of a large Aneheim pepper or one small one, seeded and cut into chunks
A heaping teaspoon of grated fresh ginger
3 small garlic cloves, peeled and cut into small chunks
1 lemon juiced
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons salt

Place all ingredients in food processor and pulse until everything is well combined and it’s at the consistency you want.

Serve the curried with lentils with a big spoonful of your cilantro sauce on top and enjoy.

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Meatless Monday: Butternut Squash & Sage Risotto

Butternut Squash & Sage Risotto

From BBC Good Food

Serves 4

Hard squash has started making an appearance in the Local Box lately- try this creamy, satisfying veggie recipe where butternut squash is the star.

Butternut squash & sage risotto

Ingredients

2 lbs butternut squash , peeled and cut into bite-size chunks
3 tbsp olive oil
bunch sage , leaves picked, half roughly chopped, half left whole
6 1/2 cups vegetable stock
1/4 cup butter
1 onion , finely chopped
1.5 cups risotto rice (we used arborio)
1 small glass white wine
1/2 cup parmesan , finely grated

Instructions

Before you make the risotto, heat oven to 400F. Toss the squash in 1 tbsp oil together with the chopped sage. Scatter into a shallow roasting tin and roast for 30 mins until it is brown and soft.
While the squash is roasting, prepare the risotto. Bring the stock to the boil and keep on a low simmer. In a separate pan, melt half the butter over a medium heat. Stir in the onions and sweat gently for 8-10 mins until soft but not coloured, stirring occasionally. Stir the rice into the onions until completely coated in the butter, then stir continuously until the rice is shiny and the edges of the grain start to look transparent.

Pour in the wine and simmer until totally evaporated. Add the stock, a ladleful at a time and stirring the rice over a low heat for 25-30 mins, until the rice is cooked al dente (with a slightly firm, starchy bite in the middle). The risotto should be creamy and slightly soupy. When you draw a wooden spoon through it, there should be a wake that holds for a few moments but not longer.

At the same time, gently fry the whole sage leaves in a little olive oil until crisp, then set aside on kitchen paper. When the squash is cooked, mash half of it to a rough purée and leave half whole. When the risotto is just done, stir though the purée, then add the cheese and butter and leave to rest for a few mins. Serve the risotto scattered with the whole chunks of squash and the crisp sage leaves.

Meatless Monday: Chickpea “Crabcakes”

Chickpea crabcakes

From USA Today

This recipe comes highly recommended from a good friend we met at an Engine 2 Diet potluck. Down South we typically refer to chickpeas as garbanzo beans, and in this recipe they provide the “meaty,” filling texture you expect from crabcakes.

You can use canned garbanzos to skip the process of soaking dried beans for 8 hours and start cooking immediately!

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup dried chickpeas, soaked for about 8 hours and drained
  • 1 1/2 cups yellow onion, roughly chopped (not quite 1 large onion)
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro and/or parsley, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 tsps. Old Bay seasoning
  • 1/2 tsp. cayenne
  • 1/2 tsp. dry mustard
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 8 soft hamburger buns or English muffins

Directions:

In a food processor, pulverize the soaked and drained chickpeas using the “pulse” function until beans form a paste that sticks together when you squeeze it in your hand. Be careful not to overprocess; too smooth, the batter will fall apart when cooking.

Add the rest of the ingredients (except the oil) and combine using the “pulse” function approximately 12 times; batter will be somewhat grainy and speckled with herbs. Shape into patties using a scant 1/2 cup measure (for large) or 1/4 cup measure (for sliders) and refrigerate until firm, about 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

In a shallow 12-inch skillet, heat 1/4 cup of the oil over medium-high heat. Gently place the patties into the hot oil in small batches and fry the first side until golden brown, about 3 minutes.

Gently turn onto the second side and cook for an additional 3 minutes. Transfer patties to a baking tray to finish cooking in the oven for 8 minutes.

(Before frying the next batch, heat remaining oil.)

Serve on a bun with cocktail sauce or your favorite condiment.

Servings: Makes 8 entree-size patties or 12 mini-sliders.

Meatless Monday: Butternut Squash Lasagna

The first signs of fall are creeping in as Butternut Squash returns to the Local Box this week. It is the star of the show in this lasagna, and we promise no one will miss the meat in this hearty recipe. As written the recipe yields 2 lasagnas of 6 servings each, so feel free to halve it for your purposes – although the leftovers would make a great healthy lunch!

Another cool thing is that the recipe also includes instructions at the bottom for making the lasagna ahead and freezing it unbaked, so you have an easy, healthy meal ready to pop in the oven later in the week.

Butternut squash lasagna

Recipe from Cooking Light

 

Ingredients

  • Cooking spray
  • 3 cups chopped onion
  • 10 cup fresh spinach
  • 3/4 cup (3 ounces) shredded sharp provolone cheese
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 (15-ounce) carton part-skim ricotta cheese
  • 1 (15-ounce) carton fat-free ricotta cheese
  • 3 cups diced peeled butternut squash
  • 6 cups Smoky Marinara (or other marinara of your choice)
  • 12 oven-ready lasagna noodles (such as Barilla)
  • 1 cup (4 ounces) grated fresh Parmesan cheese

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 375°.
  • Heat a large Dutch oven coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat. Add onion; sauté 4 minutes or until tender. Add spinach; sauté 1 1/2 minutes or until spinach wilts. Combine provolone, parsley, salt, pepper, eggs, and ricotta cheeses in a large bowl.
  • Place squash in a microwave-safe bowl. Cover and cook on high 5 minutes or until tender.
  • Coat the bottom and sides of 2 (8-inch-square) baking dishes with cooking spray. Spread 1/2 cup Smoky Marinara in the bottom of one prepared dish. Arrange 2 noodles over sauce; spread 1 cup cheese mixture over noodles. Arrange 1 1/2 cups squash over cheese mixture; spread 3/4 cup sauce over squash.
  • Arrange 2 noodles over sauce; spread 1 cup cheese mixture over the noodles. Arrange 1 1/2 cups onion mixture over cheese mixture; spread 3/4 cup sauce over spinach mixture.
  • Arrange 2 noodles over sauce; spread 1 cup Smoky Marinara evenly over noodles. Sprinkle with 1/2 cup Parmesan. Repeat procedure with remaining ingredients in remaining pan. Cover each pan with foil.
  • Bake at 375° for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake an additional 30 minutes.
  • To freeze unbaked lasagna: Prepare through Step 6. Cover with plastic wrap, pressing to remove as much air as possible. Wrap with heavy-duty foil. Store in freezer for up to 2 months.
  • To prepare frozen unbaked lasagna: Thaw completely in refrigerator (about 24 hours). Preheat oven to 375º. Remove foil; reserve foil. Remove plastic wrap; discard wrap. Cover lasagna with reserved foil; bake at 375º for 1 hour. Uncover and bake an additional 30 minutes or until bubbly.


How to Cook Winter Greens

If you’ve seen the Greenling newsletter this week, you know that we’re celebrating a great season of greens! Winter is prime time in Texas for kale, spinach, curly mustard, collards, arugula, bok choy, and lots of other leafy vegetables. These nutritional powerhouses are fun to cook with and easy to include in meals, either as main dishes or as sides.

The guide below gives some basic cooking methods for greens, plus suggestions as to which vegetables are best suited for those methods:

Greenling’s Cooking Guide to Greens

Of course, a great way to enjoy greens is on their own, either as a side dish or an entrée.  The chart above can help you to incorporate greens into some familiar recipes. Simply match the cooking style of your existing recipe to one of the greens you have on hand. For example, if you’re making scrambled eggs, any of the greens in the “sauté” column will make a great addition: sauté a 1/2 cup of finely chopped greens in a skillet, then add two eggs and cook them as usual.

Add any greens from the “boil” column to comforting dishes like this chicken noodle or tortilla soup for a painless extra serving of veggies with lunch or dinner. Same goes for the greens in the braised column. During the last 10-20 minutes of cooking, throw in a few cups of chopped beet greens, chard, kale or spinach to your favorite braised bratwurst, tofu, or chicken recipes, and you’ve got an instant, one-dish meal.

The biggest secret to cooking with greens is to use the freshest ones you can. Fresh greens from a local farm are more nutritious and taste better than greens that have flown across the country before sitting on a grocery store shelf all week.

It’s also important to choose organic greens, since conventionally grown greens like spinach, lettuce and kale carry high levels of pesticide residue, even after washing.  Give your family a green challenge this week and try to include leafy vegetables in as many meals as you can.  Your taste buds– and your local farmers– will thank you!